Tagged: radar records Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • davidwills 6:31 pm on November 1, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: andre the giant, , , Barrack Obama, , , giant, , , , obey, obey the giant, , , radar records, Shepard Fairey, , Street Art,   

    Obey The Bubbles 


    Welcome thrill-seekers to an impromptu Barney Bubbles / Shepard Fairey mash-up. Made possible by reshuffling some of Shepard Fairey’s LPs that appear as part of his current exhibition in London. Cunningly created onsite by my London correspondents R&M.

    All “Shepard who”? He’s the Obey Giant guy; Barrack Obama’s Hope street artist of choice.

    Show is at The Stolen Space Gallery, The Old Truman Brewery, Off Brick Lane, London E1. Closes on November 4th.

    Advertisements
     
  • davidwills 8:38 am on November 27, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2012, , , , , , , , , january, , radar records, radio   

    Barney Bubbles – Turned On, Tuned In, Dropped Out 

    Barney Bubbles artwork detail

    Mark Hodkinson’s BBC Radio 4 documentary about Barney Bubbles now has a broadcast date: 2 January 2012 at 16:00 GMT. Or for us folks in California, 8:00 PST. Also available at other times in other locations around the world. Turn on, tune in, drop out. The visual accompaniment to this newsflash shows two antennaed daschunds, and are of course, a product of Barney’s tripped-out imagination.

    (Thanks to R&M for the image.)

     
    • Rebecca and Mike 6:23 pm on January 2, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      The Radio 4 documentary by Mark Hodkinson is currently available online. Go here http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b018wh7h

    • Rebecca and Mike 6:09 pm on January 9, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Review in The Guardian, 8th Jan 2012:
      “Back to Radio 4, where us grey-hairs should be, for a revealing documentary on Barney Bubbles, the legendary album sleeve artist. Presenter/producer Mark Hodkinson was excellent, sensitively interviewing Bubbles’s sister Gill (sic) and son, asking the hard questions – “How did you feel immediately afterwards?”: to Gill (sic), on finding her brother dying – as well as keeping in telling detail. (“He looked like he came out of the ground,” said Brian Griffin, a friend.) And I liked the blasts of music from Elvis Costello, Depeche Mode, Nick Lowe, without the tedious “and that was…” back announcements. Lovely, careful, touching stuff.”

      Review in The Telegraph 3rd Jan 2012
      In Search of Barney Bubbles (Radio 4, yesterday) was sad and strange. Mark Hodkinson was tracking down a man who designed brilliant sleeves for record albums in the 1960s and 1970s. Barney Bubbles was the pseudonym of Colin Fulcher, clever, inventive, sensitive, influential, born in London in 1942. He did covers for albums by Ian Dury, Elvis Costello, Billy Bragg, Hawkwind, was the in-house designer for Stiff Records. He also did drugs, was a manic depressive, self-harmed, committed suicide in 1983. You could tell how it was all going to end and, to be honest, I did start thinking “oh, I don’t want to hear any more…” but then Hodkinson did that essential radio magic trick. He turned his dreams and memories into something we could share so that, just for a second, you could feel what it was like to be him, a teenager on a Lancashire housing estate, looking up at the night sky, listening to Hawkwind, being taken to unexpected places of the heart and mind’s eye. A second or two is all it takes when the radio is this good.

  • davidwills 8:39 pm on April 25, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1979, 7 inch, , , church, , cracking up, , dentist, , fetish, flag, guitar, hammer and sickle, , labour of lust, litho print, , , nick lowe, radar records, record sleeve, rubber glove, teeth, USSR   

    A story about red rubber, acid-proof safety-gloves hanging on hooks in a row 

    crackingupa

    crackingupbcrackingupccrackingupd

    Damn, these are transcendently* chill.

    This reminds me that, Fulcher, as Barney Bubbles then was, said the best thing about our visit to the Fulham gasworks in ’63, was the rack of red rubber, acid-proof safety-gloves hanging on hooks in a row.

    I think Fulcher/Barney’s recurring images of masks and  the use here of gloves (masks for hands), as I’ve writ elsewhere, comes from his visual amusement in ‘change.’ This was the word he chose to answer his teachers, John Kirby and Wentworth Shields’ exercise to choose a significant word and illustrate it graphically.

    It also reminds me of his excitement in 1964 reading Puddin’ Head Wilson, Mark Twain’s book that plays with identity exchange, and how, based on the story, he asked sculptor David ‘Chas’ Chedgey to swap identities with him.

    The grin in the glove with crooked teeth: In his twenties, Barney, like many then in Britain, had rotten, crooked and yellow teeth. His chum, Kate Moon, has said that Barney’s were a recurring problem, that when he had them fixed, at about the same time she cut his long hair, around 1975, they were transformative events in his life.

    I also dimly remember saying to Barney on a visit sometime about then, outside 307 Portobello, that he should get his pegs fixed. I remember for two reasons, one because I suffered from the same problem myself and had had dental work done in San Francisco at great expense by a fairly incompetent dentist called Kirby, but which made a huge difference to my comfort, and two, because it was so unusual for either of us to have such a personal conversation.

    You can see evidence of this dentaphobic behavior in early pictures of Barney where he often has his hand over his mouth to hide his teeth. See us three workers posing to commemorate completing the first Music Video (which co-incidentally features a broken guitar), and deliberately facing away to hide while painting the A1GGz’s bus. Barney generally disliked getting his picture taken. Unless of course he was directing the shoot – see The Erections.

    •••

    About this sleeve: This record is not an album, but a seven inch single. The back, where the hammer and sickle is made from the parts of a demolished guitar, is Barney’s take on the flag of the USSR, whose early Agitprop graphics inspired him so. The dots on the labels spell out N for Nick and L for Lowe.

    • I had earlier mistakenly spelled transendental (better than others) as transendentally (cosmic) which is not what I meant, but possibly true if you’re into that sort of thing.
     
    • Blog Tag 1:30 pm on April 30, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, you have got a nice blog. I have started a blog too. It’s about reviewing other blogs. This way i place a short description, a snapshot and a backlink to your blog. In return, I ask for a back link from your blog.
      Check it out at blogtag.co.cc .

    • rebecca and mike 6:42 am on May 1, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      hmmm… industrial-strength rubber gloves…
      another one makes an appearance on the inside sleeve of Elvis Costello’s ‘This Years Model’, UK issue 1978.

    • davidwills 6:45 pm on May 1, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you very much for adding substance to the lore of Fulcher’s Big Adventure. Where is the glove on This Year’s Model? a quick glance at Google images revealed naught.

    • rebecca and mike 6:41 am on May 2, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      on the inner sleeve (not the outer sleeve)

    • davidwills 8:29 pm on May 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Visiting London in ’75, while standing outside 307 Portobello on a sunny day as Barney showed off his new Hawkwind graphics, I told him that, having had some intense dental work of my own, I knew it would seriously change his life if he got his bright-yellow, seriously-crooked British teeth fixed, I go, “You should git yer teef fixed.” He’s all, “Yeah.”

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel